Cultural Trends: How driving trends are impacting the housing market

 

As we have mentioned in previous blog posts, home buyers continue to consider their daily commute when making home purchase decisions. Some Americans are limiting their driving or forgoing cars all together. In recent years, the driving trends of Millennial and Boomer generations have decreased steadily. More Americans in general are embracing alternatives to driving like mass transit, walking, bicycling, car sharing, and working from home.

Recent studies and articles in publications like the Washington Post and theNew York Times document declining automobile use. Driving measured by consumption of auto fuel tells the same story. Whether you are a home buyer, seller, or owner, these trends may impact your decisions in new and surprising ways, with the value of your home being shaped, at least in part, by this trend.

If you are in the market for a home, considering your commute, walk-score, and transportation options could be an important part of determining if a particular neighborhood is right for you. It might also be helpful to seek out the assistance of a real estate agent familiar with such issues.

Real estate companies have started adding search features to their websites to assist buyers with evaluating commuting information. For example, Windermere recently added INRIX DriveTime™ to its website which allows home buyers to search for homes based on commute times. Walkscore.com and Transitscore.com provide home buyers with a quick and easy way to assess the quality of a community based on walkability and access to mass transit. These online tools highlight those homes with shorter drive times and higher walkability, factors which could end up impacting the value of certain homes as some buyers “vote with their feet,” rather than with their car.

Real estate developers are embracing this trend too by building in locations that reduce car use; this is why you may notice an increase in new housing as you travel from suburban neighborhoods into cities like San Francisco, Portland, San Diego, or Seattle. In some of these cities, it is increasingly common to see townhomes built in more walkable neighborhoods, many without dedicated, private garages. 

City planners are encouraging such construction by changing zoning laws to foster "Transit Oriented Development," (TOD). TOD changes zoning to incentivize developers to create new housing construction close to light rail stations, with progressively lower housing density to about 1/2 mile from their stops. This solves what city planners have come to call the "last mile problem," (getting more commuters home from a transit hub). Cities with TOD initiatives include Seattle, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Salt Lake City Metro Area, and the Portland Metro area.

With experts saying that consumers are trending towards less driving, home buyers may wish to evaluate the location of their purchase by asking themselves the following questions:

  • Does this neighborhood lower the cost of living, while increasing the quantity and quality of free time, by increasing my independence from cars?
  • What is the travel time between the places those in my household frequent most, such as home, work, schools, and recreational amenities?

If you are selling your home, consider highlighting its location as one that might improve the quality of life for the next residents by showcasing drive time, walkability, and proximity to transit—to the extent that such benefits exist.

Studies continue to show that the amount of time a person spends commuting every day is a major factor when buying a home. In recent years, there has also been a significant trend towards mass transit and reducing one’s “carbon footprint” by driving less. This is important for both buyers and sellers to keep in mind, as these factors can have a significant impact on the long-term value of a home – and on the quality of life for you and those in your community.

 

 


Posted on November 1, 2013 at 11:55 pm
Edward Krigsman | Posted in Uncategorized |

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